A Letter to Whom It May Concern

St. Marys Holy Faith Killester Secondary School

A Letter to Whom It May Concern

Another child left at home, another to add to the other 250,000 Romanian children whose parents have left to work abroad. I live with my granny, Eugenia. She is 87 and has been through enough in life, she doesn’t need another burden. But it was she who proffered to take me. She is the one I call ‘mother’. We live in a diminutive one-room house in an impoverished area of Romania, called Lungani.  My parents left when I was 5, I’m 12 now. They said they would leave for one year and then return. My parents moved to Italy. They left to make a more superior living for me, or so they said.  My final cheerful memory of my parents was my wonderful holiday to Italy. They managed to book me a trip when I was 7. I recall for the first time staying in an ordinary house, they gave me delectable sweets. They bought me brand new clothes. I was there for 2 weeks and I remember every moment of this cheerful time. I cherished every moment. This was my only holiday, but it was the most outstanding time of my life. Having both of my parents at my side was abnormal for me but I got to feel my parents love. We then visited some prepossessing tourist attractions.

After four more strenuous years of living with my granny, my mam and dad made a phone call home. They gave me the most exhilarating news, they told us they were moving back to Romania. They also gathered a significant amount of money while there and to make it all better, my dad was offered a place to work, here in Romania.  We were waiting for my parents to arrive at the airport. We were waiting for them when suddenly, my granny received a call. I listened in to hear who it was, it was a male voice, but it wasn’t my dad’s voice. As I listened in to what he said, I felt extremely dizzy and my vision completely faded to black, my legs were unable to hold my weight.  I woke up to the aseptic smell of weak carbolic acid invading my nostrils. The room was silent, apart from the noise of my heavy breathing. I slowly opened my eyes, squinting in an attempt to sharpen the blurred images before me. As I looked outside, I saw the sun, a glowing medallion in the sky it was saffron-yellow in colour. It was brighter than ever because now my parents were there making the sun even brighter.  My granny told me that my parents were in a taxi, returning home from the airport. Rain was falling in torrents, making it harder for the driver to see. As they were driving through the blizzard two blinding lights appeared in front of them, like two eyes trying to pierce the impenetrable darkness.

Before they were able to realize, the car fatally crashed into them.